Dennis P. Orgill, MD, PhD (Plastic Surgery)

Division of Plastic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Dennis Orgill, M.D., Ph.D. is a Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School (HMS) who specializes in complex adult reconstructive surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). Dr. Orgill grew up in northern California and studied Bioengineering at UC Berkeley. He then joined the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology program as a graduate student where he worked with Dr. Ioannis Yannas at MIT and Dr. John Burke at the Shriners Burn Hospital on developing an artificial skin for burn victims. Today, this technology is the leading skin replacement method used throughout the world and is the core product of Integra LifeSciences Corporation. Dr. Orgill completed medical school at HMS and residencies in surgery and plastic surgery with most of his time at BWH. His research experience provided a foundation for his career where he has continued to improve skin replacement and wound healing therapies.

Following plastic surgery training, Dr. Orgill joined the staff at BWH where he has developed an active practice in reconstructive plastic surgery while developing relationships with other surgical specialties. He was the Burn Director for 8 years, the Vice Chairman for Quality Improvement in the Department of Surgery for 5 years, and is now the Medical Director of the BWH Wound Care Center which is a collaborative effort between Plastic Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Orthopedics, Podiatry and Infectious Disease. He has served on numerous national committee’s including currently serving as the Vice Chairman of the Scientific Program Committee at the American College of Surgeons, Co-Chairman of the General Reconstruction Program for the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, and Board of Directors of the Wound Healing Society. He received the Research Impact Award from the Plastic Surgery Foundation in 2014. He was recently named the Editor-in-Chief of Scientific American – Plastic Surgery and was the Reconstructive Section Editor for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Dr. Orgill continues to engage in basic science research along with his clinical practice. He directs the BWH Tissue Engineering and Wound Healing Laboratory where he oversees numerous post-doctoral fellows and he has been a co-author on over 300 publications listed in PubMed. His research is focused on working to develop better technologies to treat wounds including work with artificial skin, micromechanical forces, platelets and stem cells, and combining biologics, scaffolds and mechanical forces to improve wound healing and tissue engineering constructs, as well as work on surgical quality improvement. He has consulted for several medical device and start-up companies and is the inventor on several patents.